Resources related to Zones of Temperature

To fly or not to fly: high flight costs in a large sea duck do not imply an expensive lifestyle

A perennial question in ornithology is whether flight has evolved mostly to facilitate access to food or as an anti-predator strategy. However, flight is an expensive mode of locomotion and species using flight regularly are associated with an expensive lifestyle. Using heart rate (HR) data loggers implanted in 13 female common eiders (Somateria mollissima), our objective was to test the hypothesis that a high level of flight activity increases their energy budget.

Implications of Demographic Uncertainty for Harvest Management of North American Sea Ducks

In 2010, the Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV) identified the need for improved science support for harvest and habitat management of North American sea ducks.
In order to prioritize monitoring and research needs in support of harvest management, we applied a Prescribed Take Level (PTL) framework to assess the influence of uncertainty about sea duck demographic
parameters on comparisons of observed and allowable harvest estimates. We focused on 7 populations of North American sea ducks: the American subspecies of common eider (Somateria mollissima dresseri

Habitat Features Associated with Barrow's Goldeneye Breeding in Eastern Canada

We investigated environmental variables linked to presence of Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica) pairs from the eastern North American population on 412 lakes of the Sainte-Marguerite River watershed, Québec, Canada. We analysed habitat relationships at two spatial scales (i.e., considering all lakes surveyed and high elevation lakes only) and predetermined the high elevation lakes as those including 90% of Barrow's Goldeneye occurrences. Barrow's Goldeneye were found on 59 lakes, all of which were ≥490 m elevation (maximum = 822 m) with 90% at ≥610 m.

Body Composition Dynamics of Common Eider During Winter: An Application of the Deuterium Dilution Method

The nearshore and offshore waters of southern New England provide some of the most
important wintering habitat for sea ducks in North America. Understanding changes in sea duck body
composition during winter could provide insights into current habitat quality and potential effects of
anthropogenic disturbances on the body condition of sea ducks. We used the deuterium dilution method, a
nonlethal approach, to investigate intraseasonal variation and differences between genders in body

Fitting statistical distributions to seaduck count data: Implications for survey design and abundance estimation

Determining appropriate statistical distributions for modeling
animal count data is important for accurate estimation of abun-
dance, distribution, and trends. In the case of sea ducks along the
U.S. Atlantic coast, managers want to estimate local and regional
abundance to detect and track population declines, to define
areas of high and low use, and to predict the impact of future
habitat change on populations. In this paper, we used a modified
marked point process to model survey data that recorded flock

Sea Duck Joint Venture Strategic Communications Plan 2015-2019

The mission of the Sea Duck Joint Venture(SDJV)is to promote the conservation of North American sea ducks through partnerships by providing greater knowledge
and understanding for effective management. SDJV focuses on the 15 species of North American sea ducks on their coastal water habitat for migration and wintering as well as boreal forest and tundra habitat for nesting. Since the JV’s founding in 1998, the four pillars of its work have included science, communications, funding, and conservation.

A Management Plan for Barrows Goldeneye Bucephala islandica Eastern Population

The world distribution of Barrow’s Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica) consists of three
separate populations: 150 000 to 200 000 birds in western North America (Eadie et al 2000),
a resident population of 2000 in Iceland (Gardarsson 1978), and approximately 4500 birds in
eastern North America (Savard and Dupuis 1999; Robert et al 2000a). The breeding range is
discontinuous in North America and is largely restricted to northwestern North America, where
more than 90% of the world’s population breeds (del Hoyo et al 1992). Little is known of the

Distribution and Abundance of Steller's Eider's In The Kodiak Archipelago, Alaska Jan-Feb 2001

Concerns about apparent declines in Steller's eider (Kertell 1991) and other sea duck populations
prompted personnel of the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge to initiate an annual winter aerial
survey to assess and monitor sea duck populations.The fourth Kodiak aerial Steller's eider winter survey was flown from 29 January to 2 February
2001, covering most of the eastern coastal portion of the Kodiak Archipelago. The survey design
consisted of a single flight parallel to the shoreline between 200 and 400 meters offshore, with s-