Resources related to Ecological Regions

Level III and IV Ecoregions of the Continental United States

Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas.

Northwestern Interior Landscape Conservation Cooperative

Conservation needs in Alaska and across the nation require an unprecedented
collaborative effort that links science and conservation with the combined
capacities of many conservation partners. Landscape Conservation
Cooperatives (LCCs) are self-directed partnerships that provide science
support for conservation actions that address landscape-level challenges or
stressors such as climate change. The Northwestern Interior Forest LCC is
one of 21 LCCs identified nationally to complete a network approach of

Aleutian Bering Sea Landscape Conservation Cooperative

The Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ABSI -LCC) is one of 21 Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) identified nationally to complete a network of LCCs across the nation. The LCC concept was formed as land and resource managers recognized that dealing with the potential effects from climate change will require a stronger level of collaboration. They are designed to provide connections between researchers and managers seeking to address large landscape and seascape concerns.

Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ALCC)

The Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ALCC) supports conservation in the arctic by providing applied science and tools to land managers and policy makers. It is a self-directed partnership that functions through a structure of at-large partners, a core staff, and a steering committee of cooperating agencies and organizations. Its geographic scope ranges across North America from Alaska to Labrador. The Alaska portion encompasses three eco-regions: the Brooks Range, the Arctic Foothills, and the Arctic Coastal Plain.

Alaska ShoreZone Coastal Habitat Mapping and Imagery

The ShoreZone mapping system has been in use since the early 1980s and has been applied to more than 40,000 km of shoreline in Washington and British Columbia (Berry et al 2004; Howes 2001). Through partnerships with other agencies and organizations, portions of southeastern and central Alaska have been imaged and mapped. This project is funded by NOAA and a number of other agencies and organizations as listed below.

Sea Duck Ecology - Investigating the wintering ecology of surf scoters and long-tailed ducks

North American populations of breeding surf scoters and long-tailed ducks appear to be decreasing. Along the Atlantic coast, wintering populations of surf scoters are suspected to be decreasing, while the status of wintering populations of long-tailed ducks remains unknown. These trends have led conservation organizations to assign a "high" relative conservation priority to both species.

At Sea Distribution of Spectacled Eiders: A 120-Year-Old Mystery Resolved

ABSTRACT.-The at-sea distribution of the threatened Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) has
remained largely undocumented. We identified migration corridors, staging and molting areas, and
wintering areas of adult Spectacled Eiders using implanted satellite transmitters in birds from
each of the three extant breeding grounds (North Slope and Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in Alaska and
arctic Russia). Based on transmitter locations, we conducted aerial sur­ veys to provide visual

Sea Duck Research at the Centre for Wildlife Ecology

The Centre for Wildlife Ecology has several studies underway that address conservation issues affecting sea ducks along the Pacific coast. The issues, species, and populations being studied are shared concerns of the Centre for Wildlife Ecology, the Canadian Wildlife Service, and agency and academic collaborators throughout North America.

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