Resources related to Distribution

Draft 2011 Pacific Flyway Data Book

The following briefing material has been assembled for use by the Pacific Flyway Council and by U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service
personnel in formulating recommendations for the 2011-2012 waterfowl hunting seasons. This collection of harvest, population,
and hunter data can also serve as a desk-top reference for providing responses to inquiries from agency personnel, the media, and public.
A few points to mention with regard to the information contained in this report:

Behaviour and Ecology of Sea Ducks

Sea Ducks have been marginalized in Waterfowl conservation and management programs as most attention has been focused on the "sport ducks" notably mallards. In fact much of our understanding of the demography and harvest of ducks is based on the mallard model. Preceived lack of interest in the Sea Ducks had led to liberal management of this group. Large harvests in Southern areas and intense subsistence use in the North have proved a dangerous combination.

Found Transmitter A Needle in a Haystack

At first glance the radio transmitter looked like a firecracker with a long fuse. It was a lucky fluke, not a firecracker – that transmitter lying on the Mendenhall Wetlands near Juneau had been implanted in a sea duck ten years earlier and 900 miles south.
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Scoters nests are scattered over a vast area from eastern Interior Alaska across northern Canada, and for this reason, scoter nesting habits have been poorly understood and historically difficult to research. Implanted radio transmitters for ducks have contributed valuable insights in recent years.

Wintering Snowy Owls feed on Sea Ducks in the Belcher Islands, Nunavut, Canada

j. Raptor Res. 37(2):164-166¸ 2003 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.
Short Communications
While studying the ecology of sea ducks wintering around the Belcher Islands, we
also recorded Snowy Owls (Gilchrist and Robertson 2000). Herein, we expand on
our observations of Snowy Owls, describing their distribution and their relationship
w•th wintering Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima) and Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

Atlantic and Great Lakes Sea Duck Migration Study

This study is a large scale, multi-year, collaborative project that will use satellite telemetry to document annual migration patterns and habitat use. Driven by a lack of knowledge on sea duck distribution, migration patterns, and seasonal habitats used, the Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV) partnership has launched a large-scale satellite telemetry study of sea ducks in the Atlantic Flyway. From 2009 to 2013, about 300 transmitters will be deployed in four species: Black Scoter, Surf Scoter, White-winged Scoter, and Long-tailed Duck - all species of high conservation concern.

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